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Help stop the suffering. Reach out to your local member and ask them what they’re doing to make allied health accessible for all at this federal election.

Find out which electorate you are in here by entering your postcode or suburb.

For background on candidates, how to contact them and other electorate information, both the  ABC Australia Votes page, and The Poll Bludger are good resources.

For information on which candidates support allied health, see our election report cards.

We have used these and other websites to produce an overview of which seats are likely to be key for this election – detailed below in our overview.

Make allied health accessible for all at this election Make your vote count.

Read about the impact of lack of access to allied health and tell us your story here.

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A link to our press release is available here.

AHPA surveyed both political parties and  independent candidates regarding their commitments to allied health in the upcoming election.

Read the report card detailing responses from major political parties here.

Read the report card detailing responses from independent candidates here.

[1] Due to redistributions (a re-drawing of electoral boundaries), the government goes into the 2022 election with 76 seats, down one from the 2019 election. Labor’s number increases from 68 to 69. There are six elected members on the cross bench.

In the 151 seat House of Representatives, both sides of politics need 76 seats to form a majority government. The possibilities for achieving 76 seats are –

  • The government has 76 seats post-redistribution and cannot afford any net loss of seats. As a minimum it needs to recover Hughes from Craig Kelly.
  • Post-redistribution Labor starts with 69 seats. Assuming a uniform national swing, Labor needs to gain seven seats on a swing of 3.3% to form government.
  • Assuming no change in cross bench numbers, Labor needs a uniform swing of 3.1% to gain four seats and finish with more seats than the Coalition in a hung parliament.

New South Wales

Particularly marginal seats ALP has to hold are Macquarie (0.2%), Eden-Monaro (0.8%), Dobell (1.5%), Gilmore (2.6%), Greenway (2.8%), Hunter (3%, with challenge likely to be from One Nation) and Parramatta (3.5%), and perhaps Richmond (4.1%, with the Greens also targeting).

Particularly marginal seats LIB has to hold are Wentworth (1.3%), Reid (3.2%) and perhaps Robertson (4.2%).

Independent Zali Steggall is expected to be returned in Warringah (7.2%).

Factors include the recent bushfires and floods and the NSW Liberal pre-selection controversy.

Another seat worth watching is Hughes (9.8%, currently held by Craig Kelly UAP).

Northern Territory

The ALP has to hold Solomon (3.1%), and may perhaps have trouble to hold Lingiari (5.5%) with Warren Snowdon retiring.

Queensland

Particularly marginal seats ALP has to hold are Lilley (0.6%), Blair (1.2%), Moreton (1.9%) and Griffith (2.9%, also a Greens target).

Particularly marginal seats LIB has to hold are Longman (3.3%), Leichhardt (4.2%) and Dickson (4.6%, Peter Dutton), and perhaps Brisbane (4.9%, also targeted by the Greens), Ryan (6.0%) and Flynn (8.7%).

Tasmania

Particularly marginal seats LIB has to hold are Bass (0.4%) and Braddon (3.1%).

ALP may perhaps have trouble to hold Lyons (5.2%).

Victoria

Particularly marginal seats ALP has to hold are Corangamite (1%), Dunkley (2.7%) and possibly MacNamara (6.1%) due to a strong Greens presence.

Particularly marginal seats LIB has to hold are Chisholm (0.5%) and Higgins (3.7% with challenge from the Greens), and perhaps Casey (4.6%, with Tony Smith retiring) and Deakin (4.7%).

Commentators believe that independent Helen Haines should be returned in Indi although the margin is low.

Western Australia

Particularly marginal seats ALP has to hold are Cowan (0.9%) and Perth (3.2%).

Particularly marginal seats LIB has to hold are Swan (3.2%), Hasluck (5.4%) and perhaps Pearce (7.5% and Christian Porter is retiring).

[1] Taken from https://antonygreen.com.au/ ; https://www.abc.net.au/news/elections/federal/2022/guide/preview-national ; https://www.theguardian.com and https://www.tallyroom.com.au/aus2022 .